Hard Times

I don’t know about you, but I really thought this pandemic would be mostly over by now.  Back in March, I thought that this virus would simply run its course over time and then fade quietly out of the headlines.  Sadly, it’s proven to have staying power, and although we have made great advances in testing, treatment and even vaccine development, Covid 19 is still basically ruling our lives.  And I don’t like it one bit.

I’d like to say that I always handle the situation well, but that would be a lie.  The truth is that sometimes I’m fine and sometimes I’m not.  And I can bounce back and forth between those moods with lightning speed, despite my best efforts to maintain a positive attitude.  I suspect that most people feel that way, even if they aren’t comfortable admitting it.  We live in a society that has become very judgemental, and being honest about how hard this is can be seen as a weakness, or worse, being in denial about the seriousness of the situation.

Personally, I think life during a pandemic is very challenging.  We worry about getting the virus, we worry about those have gotten it, we worry about how the restrictions are effecting the mental and emotional health of the most vulnerable among us, and we worry about those who are suffering (and those who are going to suffer) from the trashed economy.  None of that is easy, no matter how much we try to pretend otherwise.

I wish I could offer some sure-fire advice for fixing it, but I can’t.  All I know is that when times are hard, the worst thing we can do is be hard on each other or hard on ourselves.  I know how easy it is to take our frustrations and fears out on each other, but I also know that when we do that, it only makes a bad situation even worse.

Now is the time to be gentle with ourselves, I think.  It’s the time to let ourselves feel whatever emotion happens to show up, without seeing it as a sign of weakness.  We need to do whatever we can to take care of ourselves, indulging in the little things that make us happy and lift our spirits.  When this is over (and it will be over one day) no one is going to grade us on the great things we accomplished during the pandemic lock downs, I promise you.

And we also need to be gentle with each other, because the chances are that every single person you encounter these days is struggling.  Their struggles might not be the same as ours, but they are just as real.  Which means this is not the time to engage in petty arguments, take pot shots at our “enemies,” or behave in any way that makes someone else’s life even harder than it already is.

As I said, I don’t like this pandemic and I hate the negative way it has changed our world.  But I refuse to let it also change who I am and what kind of person I try to be.  Because hard times don’t have to result in hard people.

95 thoughts on “Hard Times

  1. We definitely need empathy right now. Anti maskers want to challenge those who wear masks. Maskers want to shame anti maskers. Everybody could be doing a better job to play their part in reducing the infection rate, but you won’t change my over reaction and I won’t change your under reaction. All we can do is give each other the respect we both need to continue on doing our best. Covid will decide who is successful in beating it in the end. I just feel bad for our front line workers who have to pick up the pieces, when common sense prevention precautions are not followed. I think if respect is given, the decisions we need to make will become much clearer for all. Stay well and practice Safe Six. Allan

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh, I know! I honestly think if we talked to each other, we’d realize that we have more in common than we think. I don’t personally know any anti-maskers (although I do have a wide variety of family and acquaintances over the political and religious spectrum) but from what I understand, they mostly don’t believe that masks help fight the pandemic. Which makes them misinformed, but not evil, in my opinion. And here in the States, we’re recovering from a very close election, and of course, no one is willing to even talk to those who voted differently. So sad. Because you are so right…if respect is given, and if people feel as if their concerns are truly heard, then usually, we can find a whole lot of common ground to move us all forward! I just hope that happens….. Thanks so much for your comment, Allan. Your voice is always worth listening to.

      Like

    • It’s hard, I think, when so many people are posting about how easy this is and how much fun they’re having with their extra free time. So those of us who are struggling, either emotionally or financially, feel shamed into silence. That’s never good. For a society to work, every voice must be heard. We may not agree, or even understand, but it’s so important that each of us is allowed to express our own truth. Personally, I had to be very intentional about giving myself permission to feel sad, angry or stressed. But once I did, it really helped.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes, I agree. I’m seeing that the people who refuse to acknowledge that this is not easy are the ones who are having the worst time of it. Reality may bite, but at least you know what’s going on. Stay safe, be well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, Ally! Once we give ourselves permission to say, “yeah, this is hard and it really sucks!” then our coping skills kick in and we can handle it so much better. Honesty is always the best policy, even within our own head.

      Like

  3. Amen to all you wrote Ann. Now, more than ever is the time to be kind to ourselves and to others, to let go of judgements and to realise that we’re all doing the best we can. We WILL come out of this and I have a feeling it will be with a whole lot more compassion and understanding. Sending love your way.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much, Miriam! I agree the key is to remember that we will get through this and that we all are doing the best we can, even if our coping skills are different. Love and compassion are needed now more than ever…. Love to you and your family, and enjoy the Spring and Summer that you deserve! It makes me happy to think that my Australian friends are moving into a season of warmth and sunshine!

      Like

  4. Ann, are you really nailed it with this one. For me, it all comes down to patience. I had to learn that especially during grief when my son died. It seems like there’s no end in sight when going through a difficult loss. And having a broken ankle last year also taught me a lot about patience. I am being very patient with this pandemic. I know it will end and I believe kindness will get us through, just like what you wrote.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so sorry about your son, Judy! I honestly don’t know of anything harder than the death of a son or daughter, and I can imagine that it does teach you patience as you move through the grieving process. I have a good friend who lost her daughter suddenly, and her advice has helped me deal with my husband’s cancer diagnosis, even though what I’m going through is no where near as hard as what she (and you) dealt with. That’s why it’s so important to be kind to each other…so many people are hurting, for various reasons, and helping each other is the only way we will get through it. Thank you for your insightful comment!

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome, Ann. I am very sorry to hear about your husband going through cancer. One thing that I’ve often said with grief – comparing isn’t helpful. I also remember not sharing about my loss because it made other people feel they couldn’t share with me – that their problems were insignificant next to mine. I happen to think your situation is very tough and I’m so sorry. I’m glad your good friend has been supportive. Sudden loss is horrible and I am really empathetic to her situation. I devote my life to inspire hope of healing with grief. I never believed I would ever feel better and celebrate every day that I have found healing!

        Liked by 1 person

        • That is a lovely goal, to help others who are grieving realize that they really will feel better eventually. And thank you for your kind words about not comparing. You’re right, we feel what we feel, and there is no point in comparing. Thanks for that reminder!

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh if we can just be nice, understand we have bad days and remember so does everone else. I agree with you Ann. This pandemic is hard. Thank you for reminding us to think of others, be kind, and give ourselves a moment when we need it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Honestly, remembering that this is hard on all of us, even if it is for different reasons, helps me to be kind to others as often as I can. And to give myself a good talking to when I’m tempted to be not so kind. Because we really are hurting, so now is the time to help each other, not hurt each other even more. Thanks for the comment, Lorie!

      Like

  6. Your advice to be gentle with ourselves is going to be incredibly important over the winter as this virus goes wild. I feel really sad that we didn’t just handle it last March, Anne, but here we are. Stay strong, stay gentle because you’re right, this will end. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • It will end, just not as soon as we had hoped. The numbers are rising all over the world (at least in the northern hemisphere) and that helps me to be more tolerant to realize that we really are all in this this together. But as you say, here we are, where none of us wanted to be, and so all we can do is make the best of a bad situation. And to be as kind as possible until it is over, to ourselves and each other. Thanks for your sweet comment….Hope all is well with you and your family!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I literally had tears reading it because I am tired … of hoping . And during days that I can’t find any hope , it just gets so tiring . Then I shed some tears and , I do the next best thing … get up and just keep going .. Thanks for sharing it the way you did Ann.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Deepa! I’m not surprised that you got where I was emotionally when I wrote this, since you are very intuitive. Today was a hard day, but I have to remember that we’re all going to have those kind of days in this situation, we’re all going to cry now and then, and we’re all going to lose hope now and then. But then another day dawns, and we realize that this truly will end…a vaccine is almost in the works, and treatments are so much more effective now….and we just have to hang in there until it does. And meanwhile, be kind to ourselves and each other as we struggle through the days. Hang in there, Deepa! You have a lot of company, all over the world!!!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Exactly, Alan! If we let this virus bring out the worst in us, and we embrace that new, meaner self, then the virus has won. But if we can hang on to our finer feelings, and stay true to who we really are and stay faithful to the God who is ultimately in charge, then we will come out of this okay. Hang in there!!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. You are so right. This pandemic is an epoch-defining event. We truly need to be patient and empathetic to others even if seems impossible at times. Having said that, we need to be less critical of ourselves too. There is no need to alter our ethos simply because of a stubborn virus which is more likely a weapon of biological warfare escaped from the Middle Kingdom.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly! If we let the virus redefine us, then we have let it win in a way that it doesn’t deserve to. We need to be very intentional about staying true to ourselves even in this disturbing situation. So I think being kind to ourselves and to each other is so very important right now!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. We need to be kind to each other. It’s been a long time since we have been kind to each other. I find myself crying some days and then grateful the next. It’s hard to look to the future when you find yourself entering ‘older age’. So much precious time is being lost. But at least I am still alive.
    I am purposely kind to each and every one I encounter.
    It’s the only way. For me.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I agree, Cindi! It is absolutely the only way to get through this very difficult situation. The losses are sometimes overwhelming, so the last thing we need to do is hurt each other even more. Thanks for your comment!

      Like

    • Thank you, Neil! At least we are making headway on vaccines…I heard on the news this morning that they are actually going to ship some to Mississippi next month for the first responders. Eventually, there will be enough for all of us.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Being kind to ourselves as well as others is the way forward. Thank you Ann for recognizing that this is hard on everyone, for different reasons, and how important it is the feel the emotions that come up in the highs and lows of life. So glad you shared this 💕

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much, Val! I usually try to make my posts upbeat, but this time I was a bit down when it came time to write one and I decided honesty was the best way to go. And since it seems to have struck a chord, I’m glad I did! I think it helps for us all to realize that we’re all stressed now, and that we all have our tough days. And that it’s okay to feel that way.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you for this post, Ann. This has indeed been a rough 9 months and there is no sign of letting up. I keep trying to stay positive because I know of people going through far worse than I am. My struggle is the isolation and remote working and boredom and living with chronic uncertainty. Not the worst. But sometimes it’s okay to not be okay and we don’t have to compare our not okay to others’.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Exactly! It’s the uncertainty that is the hardest…when will this end, and how? We do have reason to hope, but we also live in so much instability that it’s sometimes hard to stay hopeful. The isolation is also very hard. I worry about my mother who lives in an independent living facility. They just closed the dining room again, so that means she’s stuck in her apartment, alone, most of the time. That’s so bad for seniors!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Kindness is a welcome salve. If only more were willing to apply a little to themselves and offer it to others. I think that many are so afraid that they have forgotten that others are afraid as well. The lack of empathy has made some folks hard hearted and hard headed. Those are the ones that need an extra dose of healing balm instead of scorn/guilt/anger reflected…

    Liked by 3 people

    • That is so true! We are so preoccupied with our own fears and frustrations that we forget others are suffering too, some even more than us. But instead of help and understanding, we just offer scorn, condemnation and ridicule. And then we wonder why our society is so uncivil! We can do better than this. We ARE better than this, I think!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Kindness is a welcome salve. If only more were willing to apply a little to themselves and offer it to others. I think that many are so afraid that they have forgotten that others are afraid as well. The lack of empathy has made some folks hard hearted and hard headed. Those are the ones that need an extra dose of healing balm instead of scorn/guilt/anger reflected…

    Liked by 1 person

  14. The one thing that stands out for me during these troublesome times is the sentence in your post: We need to do whatever we can to take care of ourselves, indulging in the little things that make us happy and lift our spirits. I believe that is the key to avoid becoming a psychological victim of the pandemic. Thank you for your inspiring post, Ann!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is so true, Peter! When we let ourselves slip into victimhood, we lose our compassion and tolerance for others as well. Times are hard, but there is still much good in life, and we need to remember that. When I read about some of the struggles your family went through, it gives me hope that we will not only survive this, we will also thrive again some day!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Excellent post. I remember back in April I wrote my feelings, which were not great, and someone commented that I should get a grip and just take a walk….of course this is when everything was shut in nyc, and we weren’t even supposed to be out walking. We’ve all done a really good job of making others feel lousy…

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh, I know! When did it become socially acceptable to tell others how to feel? I hate it when people say, “you’re just being asked to stay home, how hard is that?” Because it’s awfully hard if you’re depressed or anxious, live with an abusive person, or staying home means you’re quickly going broke because you can’t work, etc. There are a million reasons why staying home is hard. And thinking about the people who are sick and dying is beyond depressing. Some days we’re going to handle it better than others, and that should be okay. We sure don’t need to judge each other!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. One thing this little virus has done is to shine the light upon our behaviours, our true selves even – and what is illuminated isn’t always pretty. Some of us can be light and happiness, kind and thoughtful – for a time. But as difficult times drag on, our true selves begin to make their way to the light. For some people, even if they do slip up on occasion, what suffering lays bare isn’t too far off from what they are in good times. For others, well, you’ve said it much better than I can, Ann.

    I think we need to learn to forgive ourselves if we haven’t loved one another better – and to go to the next hour a better person. We also need to forgive others for hurting us, though of course, that’s so much harder to do. But forgiving others and ourselves is how we can rise to the top of this never ending vale of pain.

    I believe that when we are able to do that, we will discover that there’s actually a lot of good in us, and that it needs to be shared with others.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Amen to that! Yes, forgiveness is how we rise above the pain, and it is essential to forgive ourselves and each other. I agree that there is good in all people, usually more than we know. But we’re so busy being offended and upset that we often don’t allow our goodness to show, and sure can’t see it in other people. That’s not how I want to live. It’s okay to be anxious and depressed some times (I know I am), but that doesn’t mean we have to feel that way all the time. And there is still much to be happy about too. Personally, I’ve found that if I just allow myself to feel whatever emotions I have at the moment, I move on after a short while and cheer back up. That’s so much better than pretending to feel happier than I am!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Like you, I believed the pandemic would be over by now. Or that we’d at least have it under control. Instead, it feels scarier than ever at a time of year that’s both dark and isolating, which makes everything worse, including the sense of dread I feel growing inside.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, Bev, that the upcoming Winter is making it harder to handle right now. The numbers are rising, the days are shorter, and the holidays are almost here, which make us feel the isolation even more. I think it’s good that you’re owning your feelings and are aware of the source. That’s huge. And I think it’s so important to be gentle with yourself in the upcoming weeks as you learn to adapt to this. There is light at the end of the tunnel for sure, but meanwhile, let’s all help each other as much as we possibly can!

      Like

  18. Such a wise and wonderful post! You are so right…everyone has their own struggles, even if they do not talk about them openly. A gentle spirit does seem to win the day…kindness towards ourselves and others. This situation demands so much from us; we must be patient over the long haul. Thank you for your inspiration!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Linda! And you bring up an important point: this situation does demand a lot from all of us, and when we recognize that and admit it, it makes it so much easier for us to be patient and strong. When we are told that this should be easy and we should always be cheerful and happy, it just adds to our burden because it makes us think there’s something wrong with the way we’re feeling. We begin to believe we are weak. Whereas when we acknowledge that this is hard, we can also be proud of ourselves for coping with it, and that makes us realize that we’re stronger than we though and we really can handle this!

      Liked by 1 person

        • You’re welcome, and thank YOU for being one of those kind souls as well! Your support is always appreciated….and you’re right, having faith in God is huge. I don’t think I’d be coping very well without it!

          Like

  19. ‘Hard times don’t have to result in hard people.’ Oh, Ann, that is soooo true! Like you, I thought this virus would run its course like a cold or flu, and we’d get back to normal pretty soon. That wasn’t to be. We in Illinois are seeing a dramatic spike in the number of cases, and our governor is talking about locking us all down again. We’ve got to get a handle on this — our health care workers are exhausted, hospitals overwhelmed, and still, I see people not wearing masks and refusing to put indoor get-togethers on hold. When we remember the 1918 pandemic lasted two years (worldwide), we know we’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg. Being kind — to ourselves and each other — is the least we can do — thanks for the encouragement. Hang in there!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks, Debbie! I admit I’m hoping we don’t have another two years to go, but you’re right that this is a “big one” and not a passing virus, like the Swine Flu and Ebola, and others that have come and gone in recent years. No one is quite sure how much damage this virus or the restrictions will do, and that makes people anxious and sad. But it helps so much if we can just acknowledge our pain and be gentle and kind to each other and to ourselves. We will get through this eventually….and they are making great strides in the vaccines and treatments. I take comfort in that. While we wait, we just wear our masks and use common sense, because you’re right: the health care workers need our help!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I know! No one likes wearing a mask, but it’s such a small price to pay to keep ourselves and others safe, and allow us to live our lives as normally as possible. Plus….face masks hide wrinkles!! (Always a silver lining!)

        Liked by 1 person

  20. Our Gov just instituted stricter guidelines for both inside and outside gatherings due to escalating COVID counts. My first thought was “Well, what the heck did we think would happen when kids go back to athletic competitions?” And then I thought “Well, this pretty much eliminates social activities for singles living as alone. What was that about mental health concerns?”
    And then I remember “You’re an introvert, so carry on as usual & follow the guidelines, and have some compassion for the extrovert.”
    Like you said, don’t have to be Hard People. We always have that freedom & it’s good to be reminded.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You nailed it, Liz! It’s so hard to know what is right these days…..stricter guidelines that can reduce the number of cases, but increases the depression and loneliness of those who live alone (the elderly are really hit hard by this) or allow social gatherings and ignore the fact that the virus is spread that way? Whatever the leaders choose, there is a huge price to pay. So we just have to be kind and remember that everyone is hurting, one way or another. For some, the risk of dying from the virus is very low. For others, it’s high. And for some, stay-at-home orders are no big deal. For others, they’re devastating, emotionally or financially. We need to have compassion for those who feel and think about it differently from us, and be gentle with ourselves as well, I think.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Very well said, Ann. I imagine this time will change many of us, some in good ways, some not so good. It really is a time to reflect, to be grateful, to be better people. A little more kindness in the world would be a beautiful thing. Now is absolutely that time to nurture hope, and be kind to ourselves and one another. A very uplifting & comforting post  ♥

    Stay safe & have a relaxing weekend, Ann.
    Caz xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Caz!! And I agree, we don’t want to let this pandemic change who are, unless it makes us kinder and more tolerant. Never has it been so important to be intentional about being our best self, and to help others and to take care of ourselves as well. Thanks for being one of the people who help do that!! Your posts are a huge help to so many people, myself included.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I love that idea! Just tear up our enemies list…we don’t need one! We may be against certain ideas and certain actions, but we really shouldn’t ever be against actual people. And yes, knowing the huge strides we’ve made toward a vaccine really helps. We all need hope and light at the end of the tunnel!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I know! I thought by Christmas we could gather again, but it’s not to be. At least we know a vaccine is in the works. And as you say, being gentle is a good idea at all times, not just during a pandemic. I hope we can remember that!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I think I am going to go with conspiracy theories. It is not that I believe in them, but they are just the kind of crazy I need right now. 🙂 🙂

    Actually, covid has hardly affected me. We live in the country and that limits interactions. I still do my long walks, so do chores around the house and yard, still putter – and hey, nothing has really changed.

    That’s luck for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t blame you, because the times are so crazy right now that it’s easy to believe in a conspiracy or two…plus that makes things so much more interesting!
      I’m glad you’ve been able to continue your normal life through this. We had a weekend away in the country in September, and I was kind of jealous of the people who live in that area all the time, because they really could mostly just go about their usual business. Sadly, we had a granddaughter born 6 weeks early in May, and then my husband got a cancer diagnosis in June, so dealing with all that during a pandemic was especially hard. But hey, we got through it….my granddaughter is just fine, and my husband is almost done with his treatment and his scans are clean. Still, I do miss going out to dinner at restaurants!

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s so very easy! Personally, I’m beginning to believe that the news is designed to make us scared, and social media is designed to make us hate each other….but that doesn’t mean we have to buy into that craziness. I still believe in the basic goodness of most people, and think that the best way to cope with hard times is to be kind and gentle, to ourselves and to each other. I don’t want to live in such a negative world! Thanks for your sweet comment, Barb!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! It actually took me a while to settle on that ending to the post, as I couldn’t quite find the words to express what I wanted to say. But as soon as I wrote that one, I thought…”yeah, that’s what I meant!”

      Like

  23. A great post as always, Ann! A good goal for me is to make it through the pandemic with my sanity and my relationships intact. You are right, taking out our frustrations on each other is not helpful and never good. Being gentle and kind is always best. I’m motivated by the quote, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” (Socrates)

    Liked by 2 people

    • This is such a hard time, Brenda! And everyone has different ideas about it, how we should handle it, when it will end and how. I’ve learned to have a very “live and let live” attitude with that, because the truth is, we’re just sort of figuring it out as we go. But I do believe that everyone is struggling with this one way or another, and the best thing we can do is be kind to each other and to ourselves. We’ll get through this eventually, and I don’t want to look back on it and have to realize that I made a bad situation even worse! Thanks for that quote…it’s excellent!

      Like

  24. I’m all for being kind to my fellow ‘travellers’ as we navigate these new waters. I’m also all in for challenging our governments/politicians to be open and transparent so that we can buy into their directions/restrictions. That hasn’t happened in a lot of places.
    My Doctor told me, back in May, that every patient he knew that had died ‘with’ Covid, was a patient he thought was going to die soon anyway. His greater concern had shifted to how he could help those who were suffering from the collateral damage of lockdowns or ongoing restrictions: job loss, emotional isolation, substance abuse, etc, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree that transparency is desperately needed, and why so many conspiracy theories are going around. If people know all the facts, even the mistakes that have been made, they are much more likely to pitch in and try to solve the problem. There is so much mistrust right now because a lot of what we’re being told doesn’t make sense, and that makes some people resist even the common sense solutions, such as wearing a mask and avoiding large crowds. (Just for the record, I wear a mask and avoid crowds!) Honesty is always the best policy, in my opinion. I do take hope in the advances we have made in treatments and in the vaccine that seems to be on the horizon, and I also feel very sorry for anyone who has lost a loved one, directly or indirectly, to this disease.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Totally agree. Your writing is so eloquent and so open, from the heart. Appreciate the complex set of feelings that the pandemic has brought to so many. The hardship, the pain and suffering in so many ways. My elderly mother, like many, spent all summer in a form of lockdown at the residence for seniors where she lives. Residents were only allowed to go out to doctor visits, nothing else. Visits from family were limited to one hour a week and now they are eliminated completely. Tragically the current administration totally mishandled and misjudged this epidemic and are róblame for not containing it and for the rising high numbers.

    We prepared for the long haul – did not expect this to be over soon. But I get that most did. I think we all need to adjust to life with COVID as best we can … it’s going to be months if not years before we see the end of it unfortunately. There may be no end …? Just something we learn to live with. As best we can. I think it’s hater to accept and adjust if we believe it will all be over soon.

    Amen to kindness !

    Peta

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Been there, done that! It’s funny how my mood oscillates between grateful that I’m in a much better place than others and then the other times I’m just down in the dumps. It’s natural I guess, and although there is no end in sight, I feel that all of us have adapted to a certain kind of lifestyle throughout the months and whilst it’s not ideal, I suppose there is always a light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you for sharing your thoughts 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think it’s perfectly normal to swing back and forth between gratitude and acceptance of the situation, and to despair of of the loss of our old way of life. This is not a change that any of us wanted, and it’s certainly not a change for the better. Sure, there are silver linings, but overall, it’s one giant gray cloud! Personally, I think the light at the end of the tunnel is the vaccines that seem to be on their way (a new company just announced yesterday that they have one that showed 94% effectiveness in their clinical trials). But since it will be a while before those are available to most people, sometimes it feels as if that light is a long way off…. Thanks for your comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Wise thoughts Ann. Pandemic is definitely playing with our mind and soul. But yes, probably in the world of comfort and luxury, people forgot how to deal with stress along with our whole family. Now they are learning the importance of people instead of gadgets.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Totally agree with you Friend.. The situation here in the Capital city is worst these days. The numbers are rising here. I am also taking precautions to save myself and my family.
    I like the way you express your feelings for those who are not included in the friends list.

    I can relate myself with your post.
    Good luck friend. Take care. God bless your family.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.