A State of Confusion

I’ve never been the brightest bulb on the string, which means there has always been much in the world that I simply don’t understand. When I was young, I thought that things would make more sense to me as I aged, but I was wrong.  If anything, I’m more confused now than I ever was.

I’m not talking about the obvious issues here:  how a pandemic managed to turn the world upside down, or when we decided that being angry was a good enough reason to lash out at any handy target.  (Although I don’t pretend to understand any of that.)  I’m talking about the little changes that are going on all around me, and for which I can’t find a single sensible explanation.

I have so many questions, but I’ll just give a few examples of the things that confound me.  Such as how every bank I know of is pushing on-line banking, and was busy cutting both the hours and staff at their branches even before Covid-19 arrived.  And yet what are those very same banks doing?  Building new branches, as in actual brick-and-mortar banking offices.  There’s at least five new ones under construction in my neighborhood alone.   Why in the world are they building new branch offices when they’re barely using the ones they already have?

And speaking of construction, I would no longer even consider buying a brand-new house.  Sure, it would be great to have new plumbing and wiring (I have to turn off the lights in my kitchen if I want to vacuum the family room without blowing a circuit), but I have no use for an “open-concept” floor plan.  I don’t know when we decided that having a walls was a bad thing, but it was probably the same time we decided that barn doors belonged in houses, and that the only acceptable colors in a kitchen were white, gray, and grayish-white.  I want a kitchen that is cozy and inviting, and in my opinion, most modern kitchens have all the warmth and charm of an operating room.

When I first bought a cell phone, I was annoyed because the sales person promised me the day would come when I would be completely dependent on it.   I just wanted to be able to call people, for goodness sake.  Yet here I am years later, stressing out if I forget to take my phone along every single time I leave the house.  How can I possibly get through a few hours without my phone calls, texts, and emails?  But the worst part is, that’s still not enough dependency.   According to modern standards, I should also be using my phone for social media, all my purchases, my banking, and even locking my front door.  Because then, if I should happen to lose my phone, anyone who is lucky enough to find it can steal everything in my house, empty my bank account, and go on a big spending spree at my expense.

I’m not sure if my confusion means I’m just an old fogy who can’t be bothered to learn modern ways, or if being clueless is simply a natural state for me.  I suspect it is a little bit of both.  Which I guess means that the title of this blog is at least half right:  I may not be middle-aged anymore, but I’m definitely still muddling through my life…..

103 thoughts on “A State of Confusion

  1. I couldn’t help but smile through your post Ann and shake my head, both in agreement and confusion at what the world’s come to. It’s definitely not only you that’s muddled. Just sayin’ 🤔 Take care and keep smiling my friend. That’s al we can do!

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  2. Ann, I can’t tell how old you are from your pictures but I assume you are much younger than I am (58) and I have to say it only gets worse. The question thing, I mean. Most certainly I have more questions as time goes on, not less. If someone somewhere has figured out why, I have not heard of it. I will say I make a point of not taking my phone with me now and again, sort of like a protest. Good entry, thank you.

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    • Actually, I’m 62 (the sunglasses hide a lot in a photo), so sadly, I do know things only get worse as we age! I think the only people who think they have the world figured out are the young ones, but that’s probably due to the confidence of youth. And I like the idea of deliberately leaving my phone behind now and then…I think that is a very good thing!

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      • “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”

        Mark Twain

        More information creates more answers. LOL. I will put that in an entry soon I think.

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  3. Oh Ann! Don’t be so hard on yourself! The things that have confused and confounded you have the same effect on the rest of us as well. It is the age old question – Which came first the chicken or the egg? I’m confused by the different genres of music. What is “baby metal”?When did someone decide to subdivide Rock’nRoll into 25 distinct genres and some of those are divided into multiple sub-genres?? I divide music into 2 groups – I like it and I don’t like it….

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    • Oh, I know! I think people just like to make things complicated because it makes them feel as if they have insider knowledge. Which brings me to another point I don’t understand: why do we make it so hard to recycle, considering how important that is? If I’m not sure whether something goes in the trash or recycle bin, I have to get out my reading glasses to try to find the tiny triangle that says it may be able to be recycled. But then I also have to take note of the even tinier number inside the triangle that lets me know if my local recycling center takes the item or not (which usually involves looking up the number.) No wonder so much stuff ends up in landfills!!

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  4. As one who has muddled through Middle Age to become a Senior Citizen, a lot of things baffle me as well. As to the Bank branches, I used to be the one who supervised construction of Bank branches for my employer. In 1990, we were told branches would get smaller and there would be fewer of them and that they would become a thing of the past in the early 2000s. When I retired in 2014, we were still building them and they were bigger, not smaller. Apparently, many people, seniors in particular do not want to let go of their branch. Hmmm. As to the phone, I am with you, all I want to do with my cell is find my wife, when we are at opposite ends of the store. I will take the odd photo with it, but I do not do any social media, even on my computer, except WordPress. Heck, I have not even turned my cell on for 3 weeks. I should go do that now to see if I have any messages…..

    Don’t even get me started on the Clickbait that runs on my browser news feed. Who builds this s—? Have a great night Ann. Allan

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    • That is a very good question!! They put the oddest stuff on my browser news feed too, and I never click on any of it. I’m not surprised about the banks, because top management rarely bothers to see if their ideas actually work or not before they try to implement them. My mother has a savings and a checking account, and no longer has access to the internet. If there were no bank branches, how in the world could she actually use a bank? Sometimes people want, and need, personal service. Thanks for the comment, Allan!

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  5. I am muddling with you, Ann. Thought it was an age thing, but not so sure anymore. For me it’s a privacy thing. Every app I download on my phone connects me to even more anonymous snoops. My state drivers’ license bureau sells my personal information to the highest bidder. My county sold my phone number to advertisers when I applied for a business license. For a fee anybody can get online and obtain really personal information. My TV collects data on me every time I watch the news. Just old-fashioned maybe?

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    • Sadly, the concept of privacy is getting to be really old fashioned. Younger people don’t even understand why it’s a problem that their every move and even their words (hello, Alexa) should be tracked. Personally, the idea of a cashless society and no brick and mortar stores even creeps me out, because then every single thing we buy will be trackable. But I know that is coming!

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  6. Banks, post offices and creatures like those are a thing of past, courtesy the wave of technology manifested through that thing called mobile phone. Bankers have not truly become extinct, and they seem to be passing through some existential angst in its final throes, where they are not sure of their bearings on the earth or clouds or the Internet. You can trust me when I say that as I am also a banker, although an accidental and a reluctant one. The technology seems to have eaten away the walls of privacy in various domains of our lives, and I wonder that is why the walls have been vanishing from our homes I am not a Luddite by any stretch of imagination, but I am not relishing any of this.

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    • I’m not either! There is no privacy anymore, and a large segment of our society doesn’t even want privacy. I don’t think they’ll miss it until it is too late. I think our emotional health demands a little bit of privacy and time to ourselves, but it’s becoming harder and harder to get.

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  7. I’m muddling, and I’m still in my 30s. Maybe I’m the dimmest bulb in that string.And here’s a confession, i’m one of those very small percentages that don’t use a cellphone for anything. In fact, when mine broke earlier this year, I didn’t bother replacing it. I use the landline – yes, we still have them here – and, well, my laptop, which I’m attached to.

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    • I understand! Our house has a landline too, and it doesn’t even have caller ID. But it does work during an electrical outage (although not always when it rains, due to the faulty line that the telephone company can’t seem to fix). And we really don’t want to give it up!

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  8. Ann, I don’t know if I would call this a middle age or any age issue. I am just past 40, and I can’t figure out why every restaurant wants me to install an app to pre-order and pay with my debit card attached to my cell phone account. I don’t agree with Apple Pay to pay for my gas or purchases at the grocery store either. I thought I needed a smart phone when I was a contract worker and needed to be “on-call” but I also think it is ridiculous to turn my lights on at home from my phone as I pull up into the driveway. How am I too lazy to turn them on when I get in the house if the light switch is right by the door? I’m getting a degree again and going back to college for a technology degree so I can have more verifiable skills to freelance with, but it really concerns me about turning into a society that orders groceries from a webpage and has them delivered. I don’t know if this is what they intended when we went into the Information Age. I went into photography as a new skill a few years ago only to have every new phone brag about its new camera options and ability to edit and take “captivating” photos. I doubt I will even be a photographer now, if someone’s parents can take senior pictures of their kid themselves. Most photographers I know don’t even own studios anymore because everyone was taking their own pictures. I don’t know what the future holds, but I’m hoping to just have the usual day with a cup of coffee from an actual coffee pot, a real paper newspaper, and watch the news on a local channel, not streaming on my phone or on satellite tv. Maybe the millennials have the upper hand in this world, but I like the tried and true ways of the past where an actual person handled day to day operations.

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    • I agree! We are losing the human connection, and that is a terrible loss. I hate the idea of everything being ordered online, of never getting an actual human being to answer the phone when I call a company (or even a health-care provider), and even how people who have a real talent or gift (like your example of the photography profession) are being overlooked because we think “everyone can do it.” My daughter gave us a photo session with a professional photographer for my birthday and Mother’s Day, and the photos she took of my husband and me with our grandson were far superior to anything we could have taken on a cell phone! And I share your disdain for all the special apps we’re supposed to have for every service we want. Why would I want to load my phone up with those? Plus, they’re also a means for tracking our every purchase, which annoys me. I hope that the future allows us to hold on to the good things from the past, while shedding the bad ones. But I’m afraid it wont. Thanks for your comment, it was good to hear from a kindred spirit!

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  9. lol you gave me a giggle Ann, but I also sympathise!

    the bank thing is a concern, probably tax deductible; to confuse robbers; to house more bitcoin … but banks are thieves so I wont deal with them!

    house colours, here is grey white or black inside and out + all the furnishings … and they wonder why depression is on the uptake with those morbid colour schemes … what ever happened to bright cheery Colour! Who retired it?

    Phones, I leave mine at home or switch it off and forget to turn it back on until I want to use it … think this has managed to confuse the scam callers, so there is an upside 🙂

    Take care precious, nothing is worth getting in a knot about 🙂

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    • I know! I like a bit of warm color in my house, but the new designs are all gray and white, with a little black thrown in now and then for contrast. And I envy the way you handle your cell phone…if it weren’t for my family, I’d do the same. But I do have to make sure Mom can reach me in an emergency, and ditto the hubby and kids. (I admit, though, that I don’t always answer it if I really don’t want to be interrupted.)

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      • you are right Ann with my mother dead there is nobody I need to respond to urgently … it’s really quite liberating to have a phone to use, and especially not use, as I wish! Glad you ignore the call occasionally 😉

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  10. It is what is called a generational gap. Don’t worry, don’t even try to figure it out as it isn’t worth the time or effort. I figured about 5 years ago that all the social media was a waste of valuable time. Why would I need to spend what time I have left to enjoy life trying to figure out the crazy crap that is posted each and everyday on social media and why would I need it at a touch of my fingertips 24/7/365? I just stopped! Never been happier at the result. Best wishes for continued health and happiness Ann!

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    • Thanks so much! I agree, ignoring social media can be quite liberating. It also gives us a more positive outlook on life, I think, because so much of what is on social media is so very negative, and who needs that? I hope things are going well for you and your family too!

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    • I know! When my kids were little, we didn’t really have cell phones. Which was one of the reasons that we tended to hire babysitters from families we knew, because we figured if the babysitter couldn’t get in touch with us in an emergency (they always knew where we were) they would then call their mother to handle things. Now parents don’t even go in the other room without turning on the babycam…..

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  11. I think I’m in the same boat. My first house and every house in the neighborhood had all white kitchens. My neighbors and I couldn’t wait to get rid of them and replace the cabinets with warm wood tones. Now white is back. I built a house that is not open concept and I hope I’ll be able to sell it.
    As far as phones go, I think “big brother is watching you” has come to fruition.

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    • Totally and completely watching us, every minute. That’s why the photos we take on them are always labeled with our exact location. Remember when we worried about phones being “bugged?” Now we bring them into our home and turn them on ourselves, trusting that Alexa is only listening when we say her name. I think you’ll be able to sell your house, just probably not to someone under 35.

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  12. When it comes to cell phones, I am still muddling through that part of technology. I bought the simplest of phones with which I make phone calls when I am visiting the big cities and need to make calls to my wife at home. Texting is totally foreign to me. Yes, as someone said above we still have our landlines. They still work when there is a power outage. Try to make a call with your cell phone when your battery is dead. There is a lot of food for thought in your post for people of any age, Ann.

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  13. It’s a never-ending challenge to keep up, and I assume that eventually we will all fall behind! Just when you’ve got one technology down, another comes along to take it’s place. Maybe that explains why vinyl records are making a comeback, who knows?

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    • I know! I’ve wondered if that’s just a fad, and sadly, it probably is. But I do think that it’s exhausting trying to keep up with all the new technology. And still print copies of my favorite photos and store them in photo albums. Those will always work, even when whatever technology I happen to use to store them becomes obsolete!

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  14. It made me smile reading your post, Ann! The explanation, in my opinion, for the bank/technology/networks is quite simple. The banks have extra money which they are investing in real estate. Thus, building more office space. The smart phone’s main goal is to hook us up and, of course, all the social networks. That is how they get money and more publicity. The more we depend on our phones/social networks, the better it is for the companies, but not necessarily for the individual well being. Please, who needs so much technology. Sometimes it feels like someone doesn’t want us to use our own brain. However, there are nice technologies on my smartphone, like tracking my steps and GPS, that I do use often.

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    • That’s a very good explanation of the banks, Svet! And it makes sense, too. They can always sell that real estate at a profit later. And yeah, I do think most of the apps are simply ways of tracking our information so they can sell us things, In my darker moments, I also think they are ways of making us rather stupid and totally dependent on technology to do even the simplest things. And that’s not a good thing! The trick is how to use the best of technology, like a GPS, and disregard the rest of it.

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  15. This brought a (commiserating) grin out of me.

    I so get you, Ann. I take ages to learn anything remotely techie – which means I am always playing catch-up with everyone else. I work in an organization where I am among the most senior – so my struggles with tech and many other modern ideas (online shopping, social media, the many apps that sprout out etc) don’t exactly endear me to my younger colleagues.

    But during the stay-home period, I learned an important lesson. I had to work from home and to do that I needed to learn the workings of a new platform. From the general buzz, it looked like I was the only one who couldn’t make sense of this platform (well, me and another dinosaur friend, that is). I was so stressed out over that. The more tutorials I signed up for to make sense of things, the worse I got. Finally, I decided I had enough. I realised that if I didn’t put the brakes on this, I’d die of a stroke before Covid got me. So, I stepped back and decided I would learn at my (snail’s) pace (if I ever did, that is), let others laugh their heads off at me. My other colleagues used to bandy about the other more advanced features of the platform and yes, that did make me feel very small and stupid, but when you’re not born to do something, there’s little you can do about it. I only used the most basic features and very slowly, built up my confidence in using them. Over time, I began to tentatively try other features but I didn’t put pressure on myself.

    When I returned to work almost 3 months later, I had a ‘wow’ moment when I discovered that I was the only one who used that particular platform so extensively; many of my colleagues actually gave up pretty early on although they didn’t let on! That sure gave me a huge boost of confidence.

    But the most important thing I took away from this is that the world is changing at a dizzying speed, what is advanced today is obsolete tomorrow – but in order to preserve our sanity, we sometimes need to step back and just let others speed on ahead. We don’t need to embrace everything the world is throwing at us, sometimes we just need to progress at our pace or keep doing things our way. This may not always be possible, and people can make life difficult for us, but holding back for a time, may give us some wiggle room to adjust and learn and prepare for what is ahead.

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    • Thank you so much for this comment! There is so much wisdom in it: first of all, we’re not the only ones struggling, even if we feel that way sometimes. And secondly, even if we are, that’s okay. You are so right to point out that we don’t need to embrace everything the world is throwing at us, and I believe we are better of dodging some of the prevalent “wisdom” and customs of our day. As far as we are able it is okay to just do things our own way. Thank you SO very much for this affirming comment, it made my day!

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  16. Ann, I find myself wanting to refute your “not the brightest bulb” claim, perhaps because I am in agreement with nearly everything you said. I prefer to think of the dissonance with what’s happening around us (big and small) as a preference for logic and common sense. But then, perhaps I’m just muddling along, too. Thanks for a great post.

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    • I only hope that is so, Donna, because so much of what I see today defies logic, and sometimes dangerously so. I wanted to keep this post light so I only wrote about the little things, but darn…I have never felt quite so confused in a very long time. I just keep reminding myself, “this too shall pass!” Thanks for the comment!

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  17. I can go all day and not turn my cell phone on. Actually, I don’t even think of it as a “phone.” It’s mostly a camera and email connection. I hate phone calls just as much – if not more – from my cell phone as a land line. I have to agree about brick and mortar bank branches. Why build more when they are pushing customers online?

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    • Sometimes I’m in the mood for a phone conversation, but most often, I’m not. You are smart to keep yours off if you’re able to do that. My mom calls me in emergencies, and sometimes so do my kids, especially if they need help with their kids, so I keep mine on. But it is weird how I feel almost naked without it these days…. I mean, I lived for most of my life without a cell phone, so how did I allow myself to become so dependent on it?

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  18. I’m with you about the all white kitchens that look like operating rooms. We have an open concept floor plan that’s warm and inviting because of the colors on the walls– which are not white, white, white, and a different white. And about using a cell phone, I’m not one to enjoy talking on the phone to begin with let alone buying things with it. I don’t think you’re confused, I think you’re sane!

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    • I know! I would never buy things or bank on my cell phone…it’s too easy to hack a phone, and I’ve also lost one and dropped another in a public toilet (no, I wasn’t talking on it at the time, it just fell out of my coat pocket and into the toilet bowl). As for open concept, I think it’s just fine for people who like it, as we all should like the way our house is designed and decorated. I just with the builders would realize that not everyone wants open concept, and so would build some houses with it and some with more walls. But that isn’t the current trend…So meanwhile, I’ll keep on making do with ancient plumbing and electricity!

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  19. Very funny post, Ann. I can understand and relate to your confusion very well. You’re right about open floor plans. While they have some appeal you really do lose the coziness of an individual room. I suppose if you entertain large groups of people quite a bit it has some benefit but if it’s once or twice a year then your home should reflect your comfort level for the other 99% of the time.
    As for cell phones, this staying at home thing has seen me on it more than I ever used to be. I was just thinking yesterday that I have to not keep it in my pocket wherever I go. I don’t need the ability to turn on lights, HVAC, TV’s etc with a phone. I’m perfectly content walking over and doing it on my own. But that’s just me and I’m from a different, more simple time…:)

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    • You and me both, George! I’m more dependent on my phone than I’d like to be already, so I sure don’t want to start running my house with it, or bank on it. As for “tap and go” paying, I just wonder what happens when your phone is stolen? I lost mine once and called the provider to report it missing. They wanted me to access my account online so I could take care of it that way, but I needed a password to do it. I said I didn’t have a password and they said (I’m not making this up) that they would text the password to my missing phone for me. You know, so that whoever found my phone could use the password to unlock everything and access my account……. Lordy, it makes me appreciate my landline all the more!

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  20. We all have have confusions according to our enviornments. I think it’s good to write and discuss them and have a good laugh afterwards.
    I am not a mobile person. I use it when needed and I am happy with it.

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    • That’s a good point…no matter what our environment happens to be, there are always going to be things that confuse us. And it does help to write about it and make jokes about it. Thanks for the comment!

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  21. Yes, we are muddling through this life one day at a time. Sadly, some of our leaders are muddling through this pandemic along with the rest of us.
    My family did not have a phone in the house until my father had to help pay for a telephone line. I was about eight or nine years old. Now I can’t live without my cell phone. Good post!

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    • Thank you! Isn’t it funny how quickly we become dependent on something that we lived for years without? And yes, our leaders seem to be muddling right along with us, only they aren’t brave or honest enough to admit it. I think I’d respect them more if they did!

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  22. I feel just as confused, Ann. All that digitalizing seems like a good idea to many people, if not most, but I’m still a bit conspicuous of it at least when it comes banking etc. And I don’t intend to change that for as long as possible!

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    • I know! Technology can be a useful tool, but I don’t know why it has to replace actual people and buildings. Sometimes when I want to buy new clothes, I want to walk in a store and see the actual color (they can look different on a screen) and feel the fabric myself. As for banking, my husband is an accountant and he says online banking is a huge target for hackers and accounts for most banking fraud. Not exactly reassuring words!

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  23. I agree those open floor plans are terrible! I want the kitchen to be a separate room, with WALLS. I want to cook w/o having the whole world watch, and I don’t need everyone to see all the dishes… LOL on your description of the operating room look 🙂

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    • Thanks, Pam! On HGTV, people are always saying that they don’t want to be stuck in the kitchen cooking while their guests are in the other room, and I always think, “why don’t you just prepare the food before your guests arrive?” That’s what I always do! Like you, I don’t want to be on display every time I’m in the kitchen, and I don’t want to have to keep it spotless all the time because everyone can see it. It makes no sense at all!

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  24. The solution to the muddle’s easy-peasy, at least as far as phones and such are concerned. Pretend all those devices and systems and gadgety thingies are puppies, and train them. “Sit! Stay! Roll over! Heel!” When they start getting out of hand, just say, firmly and clearly, “BAD gadget!” Problem solved!

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  25. Ok, the bank thing . . . that is completely annoying. I never understand stuff like that and it happens all the time. It really must have to do with taxes and stuff . . . maybe they get more of a break for building, but it costs too much to pay people to work. That . . .and, even if we are doing banking online doesn’t some of it need humans, or no? Yeah, I don’t understand.

    I don’t like the open concept either. Or SHELVES instead of cupboards? Why do I want my dishes sitting out and getting dusty and dirty? Am I now supposed to DUST dishes? Although, I thought I saw something about open concept homes being – just discovered – as bad as open concept offices. With homes that are open they are loud and echo-y and there is no place for people to go to “get away” from other people.

    Just keep muddling, your fine. 🙂

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    • One of my other readers said the banks are actually investing in real estate when they build those branches, which makes sense. But so do tax shelters. You’d think if they have extra money they’d just pay their employees more, or build something that is actually going to be used!
      And good point about the open shelves! That’s what I always think when I see them too…now we’re supposed to dust our dishes? Who wants to do that? But the alternative is not to dust them and then eat off of dusty dishes. No wonder we don’t understand, because it makes no sense!

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    • Thanks Michael! We are doing well. And yeah, I think the people who designed the phones have a lot to answer for (those who are still with us), but we are the ones who went along with it. I hate how dependent I am on my phone!

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  26. Hahah I love it, Ann. I feel that a lot of technology is pretty bizarre and odd when you think about it, like from a safety point of view at least. As for everything else in the world, so much is backwards. It’s the word that’s weird and unfathomable, not us 😉

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    • I think you’re right, Caz! Maybe we’re not the ones who are weird at all. Although whenever I go into someone’s house and see the little “Alexa” monitor sitting there, I do feel in the minority. It’s bad enough that our computers and cell phones are tracking us constantly, but do I really want my every spoken word monitored as well? No, I do not!

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  27. I muddle too, Ann. Part of me thinks I should get “with it” when it comes to the latest trends, but the bigger part of me can’t be bothered. There’s something satisfying with the slow pace and familiar routines and spaces. Your post made me smile. 🙂

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  28. whatever boat you’re in . . you have company!! I agree about houses and cells too!! Nothing makes sense to me these days. I am about disoriented with school closing, now opening? the seasons- Daddy dying . .and the chaos! We are all “muddling” these days. Stay safe . we all need some voice of reason! love Michele

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    • You have had more than your share of things to adjust to, Michele, so no wonder you are muddling. Normal life has its difficulties, but when you have to endure profound loss and a society that has been turned upside down as well, it can be downright overwhelming. Hang in there, and keep the faith..and most of all, enjoy those grandbabies!

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  29. Building new branches when they are urging people to bank online? That’s confusing indeed.

    Unlike you, I love open space living. Right now we have a door to the kitchen, but I plan to take if off and remove part of the diving walls too. Also, my walls are all white, the flooring is grey (in the living room, most likely we will do the same in the kitchen), the conservatory is white and grey, the stairs are white and grey, the bedroom is white too, even the newly refurb garden has lots of white in it. I don’t associate an inviting space with lots of colour. If you are curious on how my home looks like, you can check my recent post on Bloggers Art Gallery. 🙂

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    • Yeah, the bank thing is very confusing to me, although some have suggested that the buildings are a form of investment for them. And I truly believe that everyone’s house should reflect their personal taste, and make them feel happy when they walk in the front door. If open floor plans and gray and white make you happy, that’s exactly what you should have in your home! My point is just that not everyone wants that, and it’s hard to find a new home these days with anything else. I wish new houses showed a little more diversity. Thanks for the comment!

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  30. Hi Ann, I get all of this! We have so many banks in our area, although a recent bank just became a Starbucks (don’t get me started). I’m okay with online banking, but let’s have some consistency, right? I’ve broken up with my phone a bit at home and will leave it alone for periods of time. It used to be when I was at work, the phone was put away, but now everything has changed because of the pandemic. We’re all using our phones at work to communicate with each other. Great post – also trying to figure things out!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, this pandemic has made us more dependent on technology for communication than every, and honestly it’s the part of the whole thing that I find hardest to accept…the lack of human contact! (Real, human contact, as in face-to-face conversations and getting together for dinner!) But I’m impressed that you were able to ignore your phone for a long time before it started, and hope you’re able to do that once it’s over too. Thanks for the comment!

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  31. Ann, I enjoyed this post very much. I used marvel at how furniture people would throw out as junk when I was young is now being recycled and resold for exorbitant prices. My grandfather’s vinyl record, which were considered too embarrassing to remove from storage, are now worth an uncountable amount. And recently, I found out that it’s fashionable to wear loose “ugly” dresses and to try and look as mismatched as possible. This works for me, because I have a lot to hide.

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    • Thank you! And yes, so much of what we used to just throw away is now considered valuable…who knew? I think that’s the best reason to just use our own judgement on what we like and don’t like. Society changes so fast we can’t begin to keep up. Thanks for the comment!

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  32. I also don’t like open concept, totally overrated, especially the whole kitchen situation. Why would I want my company to see the mess I made in the kitchen preparing a meal or holiday buffet? Unfortunately, the previous owners to our house knocked out the wall between the kitchen and dining area to open it up so I have no choice but for them to see it. But at least our living and family rooms are separate. I’ve actually thought about turning my living room into a dining room for this explicit reason. Then there’s the matter of no sense of peace or quiet or recluse. I love my old house. It has good bones, character, charm, and some semblance of separation.

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    • I know! That’s why I don’t want an “open kitchen” either. I don’t mind it being open to the family room, but I do want my living room and dining room to be separate, and I sure don’t want people to see my kitchen the minute they walk in the front door. But you also touched on my other issues with open concept: the lack of privacy and peace. I like to read, while my husband likes to watch sports and movies on TV. Since we don’t have open concept, we can do both at the same time, with him in the family room and me in the living room. But if we did, I’d constantly be asking him to turn the TV down so that I couldn’t hear it when I’m trying to read…which would lead to arguments, because then he couldn’t hear it either. There are good things with old houses. I just wish I had more modern plumbing and electricity!

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  33. They’ve closed many of the banks around here and it being a rural area you already have to travel a distance to get to town in the first place, let alone having to find the next nearest branch because they’ve closed the local one. So I definitely see where you’re coming from!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so sorry! Rural areas are a bit under-served as it is, and with the closing of banks, that’s just making things harder. Here in the States, the virus has also hit the hospitals in rural areas especially hard: the CDC ordered them to stop non-emergency surgeries and tests in order to focus on the Covid patients, and in most rural areas, there were very few Covid patients at all. Which meant no patients, which meant empty wards in hospitals and the laying off of extra staff. I can only hope they are able to recover.

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  34. I love your posts because I always feel like you are right in my kitchen talking and we are having a cup of coffee. And yes, a very cozy kitchen! It is said that there is nothing so constant as change, but although I roll with the punches, many bygone things make a great deal of sense to me. New is not always better and some things were fine just the way they were. I guess I try to mix it up a bit…blend the old and the new. Does that make sense? I do depend on my cell phone!!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It absolutely makes sense, Linda! Some of the new things in our life are a real gift, and I welcome them. Others seem a bit unnecessary, and still others seem like a giant step backwards. I guess the trick is to be discerning, and not embrace everything that “comes down the pike,” but to make our own decision about what new things we accept and what we reject. The trouble comes when the change is forced upon us, even when we don’t think it’s an improvement. But that’s just part of life!

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