Here and Now

There’s an old saying I’ve always liked that says, “Always remember:  wherever you go, there you are!”  When I first heard it, I appreciated the humor of a saying that doesn’t seem to have much of a message at all.  But the more I thought about it, I realized that wasn’t quite true.  Because let’s face it,  there are times in our lives when we find ourselves in a situation that we didn’t plan for or in a place where we never intended to be.  And worst of all, we have no idea of just exactly how we’re supposed to respond to it.

When I first heard about this pandemic, I naively thought that it would be a rather short-term thing, which made it so much easier to cope with.  But as time wore on, I found myself truly grieving for the life that I had before the nasty little virus showed up turned everything upside down.  I missed the little things, like going out to dinner with my husband after a long day, or browsing through my favorite antique shop.  I wanted to be able to buy groceries without needing a face mask, disinfecting cloths, hand sanitizer, and a whole lot of patience.

One by one, trips and events that I had been looking forward to were cancelled:  three weddings, a family reunion, and a week on the beaches of our beloved Sanibel Island.  Birthdays, Mother’s Day, Easter, and Father’s Day all had to be celebrated without our traditional family gatherings.  I hated explaining to my mother that the big 90th birthday party she had been looking forward to so much was going to have to be put off indefinitely.  Worst of all was being afraid to hold my newborn granddaughter because it might not be safe for her.

This isn’t at all where I wanted to be, and yet here I am.  And the only choice I have is how I’m going to react to it.

I’d love to lie and say that I’ve handled it with real maturity and grace.  (This is a social media, where we all put our best, and often false, face on for everyone to see.)  But the truth is that the constant stream of bad news and challenges can wear me out.  Sometimes I find myself just wanting to retreat from it all, effectively putting my life on hold until things are better.

Luckily, I know that’s not really the choice I want to make.  And I know that because whenever I push myself to “get back out there” and live my life just as fully as I safely can, I immediately feel better.  Grocery shopping these days can feel surreal, but when I discover they’ve finally restocked my favorite frozen pizza, the trip to the store seems so worth it.  While I can’t gather with my friends and family in large groups anymore, when we invite another couple over for drinks on our patio, I still have a good time.  And when I watch my son feed his new daughter, I feel nothing but happiness.

I’ve always had a nasty habit of waiting for my problems to go away so that I can begin to enjoy myself.  But the problems this pandemic has brought aren’t going away any time soon, nor are some very real personal issues my family is facing right now.  So I have to keep reminding myself that this is my life now, and that in spite of the challenges, there is still so very much to be treasured and enjoyed.  Because life is always for living, right here and right now.

112 thoughts on “Here and Now

  1. Chicken breast – for several weeks my grocery did not have my favorite meat. Then, last week, as I pushed my cart down the meat isle, there it was. Hurrah! Chicken breast at last. It’s the small things now that mean more than ever before.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My daughter and I were supposed to go on a once in a lifetime trip this spring. Who knows when it would be a good idea to reschedule. We’ve instead planned a much smaller trip, with masks, and with the knowledge that some of our favorite places to go might still be closed.
    What is it with the frozen pizzas—my son’s favorite kind is almost never in stock.
    You are right, though, life is for the living—maybe I need to post that on my mirror to contemplate when I get up in the morning.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so sorry about your trip! And I do believe that someday we will travel freely again, but that’s not always much of a consolation, I know. Meanwhile, we just have to live as fully as we can, in the hope that the future will be better and worth waiting for.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I can so relate! There are days when I am grateful for the little things and the simplicity of life now. And there are other days I mourn the loss of the freedom to gat about as we used to. And then I feel selfish. And then sad. And then grateful. And then…. just all over the place. Lol. Life has changed so much but then not really so much. You know what I mean? Just depends on how I feel that day. It used to be a few and far weekend where we just stayed home. Now…. lol. Not so much. But then I think how grateful I am for the home I have and the yard I have and those I share my home with. So you see how my mind works?! Lol. All over the place. And then back home. Content. For now. 😂🤣😂🤣❤️

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh, I completely understand, Jodi! I think most of us are like that now, and that’s okay. Things changed so quickly, and right now it is impossible to predict the future. (Argue about it endlessly, yes….that’s done all over the internet. But predict it accurately….no) So some days we are grateful and some days we are sad or even bitter. I’ve learned that it’s okay. And I don’t think we should feel guilty about it, but that’s hard too. I almost deleted this whole post because I thought, “what am I complaining about? None of my loved ones died from this.” But then I realized that all of our emotions are valid, and I want to be honest in my blog, so I just wrote what I was feeling!

      Liked by 3 people

  4. Such an important message Ann, for all of us living through this unusual and unsettling time in history. I can relate to everything you said. Best wishes to you and your family. 🙏

    Liked by 1 person

  5. That must be so hard not to see your new grandchild. It seems like every time we think things are going to settle down, then something else unexpected happens, either in our personal lives or in the world. I was doing OK with the pandemic, but now all the riots and conflict have got me bewildered. I am trying to just take it one day at a time and not try to figure out the future.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it does seem as if we just get used to one thing, and then things manage to get even worse. I think it’s okay to take it one day at a time, and to keep hoping for a more peaceful, just, and tolerant future. But we do need to be gentle with ourselves as we move through these troubling times.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Such unprecedented times we are living Ann. It is so difficult not to feel utterly overwhelmed at the enormity & impact this is all having on us and yet, we adapt & we muster on to the best of our ability.

    I hope that the family issues you are facing are manageable & that they have a positive outcome. Sending you much love & hugs.💕

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much, Lynn! These are hard times, but we are adapting pretty well overall, I think. And thanks for your kind words about our family situation. It’s hard, but I have good reason to believe it will be okay.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes, so much is different we must learn to live with the differences. Some days I’m better at it than others. Today I downloaded a facemask pattern and sewed a few in an effort to step up my accessories a notch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think we’re all better at it some days than others. Not knowing how or when it will end doesn’t help, but when I get really discouraged, I just remind myself how hard it must have been for people living through wars in their own countries, or other pandemics when they had no way of communicating with loved ones who were far away and then I realize: people are much tougher than we generally think! And that helps.

      Like

  8. We have been very fortunate in our neck of the woods. No virus has been reported in our area. Life is pretty normal around here. Mostly we enjoy being in our yard and garden. In the nearby Nakusp, a forty-minute drive from here, I do our grocery shopping just once a week. That is the town where even with the restrictions in place I get a bit anxious. We too had to cancel some trips, in order to stay safe. Other than that life is pretty normal around where we live. Best wishes! Peter

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ann, be very, very thankful that you are still alive. My brother died of the coronavirus on April 13, 2020. He was a retired eye surgeon and took all the precautions. One stop, however, to pick up a coffee and a croissant as he headed to the NYU Medical Center had him infected within 3 days and intubated by March 19th. This past weekend was Father’s Day. He’s no longer with his sons, his grandsons, his wife and my sister and I. It was also my brother’s birthday on June 21. My brother would have been 77 years old. All he wanted to do was enjoy the rest of his retirement and hang out with his 4 grandchildren. He’s never going to do that.
    Please be thankful you are still alive and your family is still intact.
    There will be a vaccine one day. Your life will return.
    Please stay healthy. Wear a mask. Social distant and please, please keep washing your hands and using hand sanitizer. The virus is very, very real. Do whatever you can to stay alive.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. You and your family have been in my thoughts, Ann. I do think those that are sailing through this without a care, are perhaps not taking it as seriously as they ought. I hope you continue to stay safe and that your favourite pizza continues to be replenished at the supermarket.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. really appreciate how openly and honestly you share your deep feelings Ann and I know many others are also finding this very exhausting.
    You are all in my prayers and thoughts … this is my preferred lifestyle. But I fear some changes are here for the long term … maybe even for ever!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Ann, just prior to reading your blog, I stopped by Dave Ply’s blog: Plying through Life. His post today Ain’t That Just Dandy is the perfect solution to covid isolation.

    He asks the question “What do you do when you have a blog oriented around travel photography, and the dictates of a global pandemic says, “thou shalt not travel!”

    So instead of looking out, he looks in at the beauty of every day things, in this instance focusing a dandelion. The post was absolutely amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I do enjoy Dave’s blog, but I haven’t read that post yet (I’m a bit behind in my reading.) Thanks for the link! I look forward to reading it, because I think that he is right, we just need to focus on the beauty of everyday things as much as we can.

      Like

  13. These are diffcult times indeed and we need to keep our patience. I am glad you wrote this post and shared your true feelings.
    There will be better days for sure.
    Cheers for your favourite “frozen” pizza 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Dear Ann, I hope it will work out with your family personal issues. This time is strange and I usually turn into music to get some sense of the situation. So there are words from Prince’s song that sums up the frustration that I feel sometimes “How can I get through days when I can’t get through hours?”. And it does bring me comfort to know that someone before me felt this way. Kisses, Svet

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I think we all feel that way right now! I saw a friend this morning and asked her how she was doing. She said, “hanging in there.” It’s gotten to the point where the answer to that question is rarely an honest, “I’m doing fine!” But we will get through this, and it does comfort me to remember that we’ve gotten through hard times before too. That line from Prince is a classic! Thanks so much for your kind words, Svet! You are a very sweet person!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. My family and I are all well and receiving paychecks. I haven’t seen my adult children in over 6 months and had trips and life events canceled as did everyone else. Our local news interviewed a psychologist and she stated that even though your life is going pretty well, all the little things that we are missing do add up and it is OK to let yourself mourn for what you are missing.
    We will get through these events, just as we have done in the past.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so sorry it’s been so long since you’ve seen your children! That has to be hard. But like you, my family all still have an income, so we are grateful for that. And I think it is absolutely okay to mourn our losses, however big or small they may be. Being honest with our emotions is a coping mechanism. And so is the hope that we have when we remember that this won’t last forever, and as you say, we have gone through hard times before.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, that’s where it gets tricky. Since this is a long-term thing, we want to maintain as much of our normal life as possible. But figuring out exactly what is and isn’t safe can take some effort, especially since some are more at risk than others. I think my husband and I are being sensible, even though we aren’t as caution as some or as carefree as others. I just hope we’re getting it right!

      Like

  16. I admit it’s been tough to be patient, especially when our numbers are climbing here in FL. BTW my husband and I spent a week this month on Sanibel. It was so nice to spend time by the water, crowds were low, very relaxing. Got my fix of calamari from Doc Ford’s!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I am so jealous!!! I so wish I could be on Sanibel to ride this out….and I love Doc Fords, George and Wendy’s, and Cips. Plus that marvelous bookstore! But we can’t travel there now, so we just have to wait. And I’m so sorry to hear the numbers are climbing in Florida. That’s added stress you don’t need.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Ann, your conclusion is a wonderful reminder to all of us that “this is my life now, and that in spite of the challenges, there is still so very much to be treasured and enjoyed.” Like you we’ve cancelled, postponed, and mourned during this Pandemic. But we’re trying to focus on what we’ve gained – precious time with each other, new cooking skills, 🙂 and closer ties with bloggers around the world as we all try to navigate this strangeness. Wishing all the very best for you and your family as you deal with your challenges. ~Terri

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Terri! I think you’ve got the right attitude. It’s okay to mourn for what (and who) we’ve lost, but we also need to remember that this strange time has brought us some gifts and to be grateful for those. Plus, I really do believe “life is for living,” even in these strange and sometimes scary times.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I like your take on how this pandemic has forced you, us, to change. Life is now. It was before, but like you I’m now embracing that idea wholeheartedly. With reverence, even.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Ally! Sometimes I waste too much energy remembering the past or worrying about the future. But life is now, and that is exactly what we should embrace. And I like your idea of doing so reverently!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. My “wise one,” Eckhart Tolle, recently said that true gratitude happens when we’re not comparing ourselves to others (as in “I’m so much luckier than she is…), but when we’re simply looking at our own lives and seeing the blessings right there, amid the challenges yet so worth a thank you! I do believe you’ve aced it!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much! Yes, comparing doesn’t bring happiness, even when we seem to be “coming out ahead.” And in these times we probably need to be intentional about looking at the blessings that are right in front of us so that we can fully appreciate them. It’s so easy to get caught up in worrying about what we’ve lost or where we’re going, but all that does is rob us of the joy of life.

      Like

  20. One of my grandmothers always said she “just had to grin and bear it”. It was something of a family joke, because grinning and bearing it was not exactly what she was noted for! However, she was right, and her cliche represents what we’re all probably trying to do at the moment. Hope things work out for you all.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I know how you feel sometimes, Ann. Tonight I desperately wanted to go to the pub down the street from us for a French Dip and a glass of red wine. I get so tired of cooking all the time or else having to eat something like cheese and crackers for dinner. Then I have to remind myself how so whiny that is because here I have food, a home, etc. and this is just temporary, even if it feels like it’s lasting forever, and if this is the worst of it, I’ve got it good. Though I may end up ordering the French Dip for take out very soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You absolutely should order that French Dip for take out! I think it will make you feel much better. And it’s okay to mourn what you’ve lost, no matter how small. We can’t dictate our emotions, and we’re all going to have a “pity party” now and then. And afterwards, we usually feel so much better. For me, it helps to live as fully as I can…which is why I say, order that sandwich you’ve been craving and just eat it at home. That way, you can enjoy it without feeling guilty!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Having read your blog posts, I’m not surprised that you came up with such a great comment! It has truth, hope and empathy all rolled into one…..thank you for that. You really do have a way with words!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. That is my favorite quote from the movie “Buckaroo Banzai”! I have difficulty at times living in the moment – I’m not a very spontaneous person and I plan ahead… Thanks for the reminder that I need to seize the day and enjoy this and every moment!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I didn’t even know that’s where the quote came from, thanks for that information! I just heard someone say it once, and remembered it because I liked it so much. And like you, I’m a planner. I think one of the most trying aspects of this pandemic for me is how it is absolutely impossible to plan anything anymore. So trust me, I’m reminding myself to “live in the moment” just as much as I am anyone else!

      Like

  23. Oh Ann- we are here with you on this too. I just beg for the day when I can freely walk around again without that nasty virus waiting to attack. My son and I talked about how this is the closest any civilian will ever feel like us military when we deploy. Isolated from family, friends, normal activities for months on end. Close quarters with people you know but as time wears on with no freedom of movement you learn things about them that irritate the crazy right out of you. It is no wonder why most of us military don’t keep in close contact after deployments. Then the shock of being back where time continued while you were gone. Although in this current situation I get the feeling I will be continuing on and my beloved USA will be changed forever. I really fear what it will be like (shock factor) when I return one day. Until then continue to hang onto those things that make you smile each day. Hug the ones you can while you can and enjoy the “finds” when shopping. Best wishes my dear blog friend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much! And yes, you’re probably right about the comparison to military life. I’ve never been in the service, but from what you describe, it is very similar to what we’re going through now, although I’m sure the danger level is much higher for the military. Still, the fear and isolation and close quarters are wearing on us, as is the lack of control over our future. I hope that you won’t find the US too changed when you get back. Things are bad now for sure, but our country does have a way of digging itself out of holes. Let’s hope that happens this time too. You are a wonderful blogging friend, and I really hope you enjoy your canoe trip this weekend! Take care!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Hi Ann – thank you for saying these things. The pandemic has affected us in many unexpected ways. Now that we realize it’s going to be a long haul, it can be discouraging and frustrating. What I find the hardest is feeling all these things and then not being able to acknowledge them because EVERYONE is going through the same thing and worse. But the feelings are real. And I have a lot to be grateful for – I keep reminding myself. Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You know, I think that we do need to acknowledge our feelings, even knowing full well that many people have it worse. Our emotions are real, and if we tried to hide them just because our situation isn’t as bad as someone else’s, we’d never let ourselves feel much of anything. Because face it, there’s almost always someone who is worse off than us, all the time. The thing to avoid is a long-term “victim” mentality. But personally, I’ve found that when I’m honest about my feelings, they tend to either go away or become much more managable. In other words, acknowledge the hurt, and then move on so you can also feel the joy!

      Liked by 1 person

  25. It’s amazing how much life has changed with this pandemic, isn’t it? This time last year we were touring Scotland on a 10 days holiday, now we are happy to go to a nearby safari park for our wedding anniversary. Who would have guessed that?
    But we can adapt and move forward in a different way. Unless a vaccine is approved, it’s unlikely we will be able to go back to the same life we had before. Hope you’ll always find your favourite pizza in the supermarket. 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is weird how quickly things changed, and discouraging to realize how long term this is going to be. I do think there will be either a vaccine or a cure for this virus eventually, or possibly both. I honestly don’t believe the covid virus will dictate our lives forever. (But that’s just my opinion.) But it will change things for the foreseeable future, so we just have to do the best we can to enjoy ourselves in the present. And you’re right….finding my favorite pizza does help, a lot!

      Like

  26. This is such a timely post! 🙂 All we have is the present and we do not want to waste it. This summer will never return to us; we need to make the most of the moments before they are gone. Even now, we can make memories…yes, things are different, but we can still have some fun. Closing ourselves off from any possible fun or relaxation is the worst possible thing. In order to get through this, we need to stay strong and still do safe things where we have a good time with our friends and loved ones.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Linda! And I agree with you. This summer will not be exactly what we had wanted, but it can still be a good one. Reaching out to others and doing the little things that bring us joy helps so much. Honestly, the people I know who are having the hardest time with this are the ones who have effectively shut themselves off from the people and things they enjoy the most. That’s not a good strategy, especially as this situation drags on. We need to remember that every day is a gift, and appreciate that!

      Like

    • I had it first when we were staying at a friend’s lake house and went to a nearby restaurant for breakfast. It sounded interesting, so I ordered it. It’s basically a pizza crust with scrambled eggs, cheese, onion, maybe some sausage, etc. on it. Then I found that Lotta Mottza has a frozen breakfast pizza, and it is quite good. Reheats just great, too, since my husband and I only eat once piece at a time. I’ve learned to make my own, but it takes time, because I use sausage gravy for the sauce. It’s not exactly healthy, so we just eat it now and then as a special treat.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. I, like you, thought this was going to be a short-term thing, but then it became obviously it’s here for the time being and we just have to make the most of it (despite all we might have lost).

    Liked by 1 person

  28. think too many people have imbued a vaccine with magical properties. I suspect it’s going to be more like a flu vaccine than a measles or smallpox vaccine in terms of efficacy. To be honest, that doesn’t bother me. Every year I get a flu shot, knowing that the effectiveness varies depending on how well they guess which strain will show up, and I haven’t had the flu for at least a couple of decades. Immunity levels count for a lot.

    It’s a bit of an irony that increased stress has been shown to increase cortisol levels, and lower immunity. Knowing that, the fear-mongers still do their thing, especially among the media. As a friend in the medical profession said when this started, one of the best ways to lower stress is to turn off the news. Once we’ve internalized the basic preventive measures to be taken — washing hands, keeping distance, masking when necessary — it’s best to just get on with life. The frustrations (not being able to travel long distances or see family) are real, and the complexities were significant in the beginning (toilet paper!) But I honestly believe that fear can paralyze as surely as the virus can kill.

    But all that said, I really came by to bring you a song. This one’s perfect for our circumstances, and I listen to it regularly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing that link! I’ve never heard that song before, even though I do know a lot of Jimmy Buffet songs. It is PERFECT for these times!
      And I agree about the fear….it amazes me how many people, in the news media and just in general seem intent on scaring everyone else. And yet, as you say, fear is horrible for our immune systems and just for our life in general. Personally, I think the way to go is to take this virus and what it can do serously, follow the protocols to keep ourselves as safe as possible, and then, as you say: just live our lives. Because I agree there is a very real possibility that the vaccine will not be 100% effective. And even if it is, there will be those who are afraid to get it. I do miss being able to gather with larger groups safely, especially big life celebrations, but that won’t last forever. Sometimes I just need to vent my frustrations, and then I feel better!

      Liked by 1 person

  29. This is our life -here right now, as it is. The virus ha changed our normal-and we have lost some treasures with it. Te unrest is a whole other matter-and has been an awful negative influence. Now friend, we all “muddling through”. But as you said, there are still sweet moments-We must cling to those. Stay safe and well. love Michele

    Liked by 1 person

  30. I don’t think I could have ever imagined this virus lasting so long. I thought I was prepared with toilet paper and face masks. I generally ok with a lot of time spent alone but now that it feels like it will always be this way, I miss being social. It’s a crazy world we are living in but at least we are lucky enough to be livign.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it’s getting tougher as it drags on and one, that’s for sure. It’s hard to know what is right anymore, but I guess all we can do is be glad that we are still here and hope for a better future. Thanks for the comment!

      Like

  31. I love the honesty of your posts, Ann. This time has certainly made me appreciate the small things, appreciate every day. Hopefully, I won’t fall back into the pattern of taking anything for granted once this is all over. It will be over, something I need to remind myself of every day. Like you said, the constant stream of bad news has worn me thin (not literally), both world news and personal. The freedom of movement is an enormous loss for me. Just the mention of “crisis fatigue” makes me feel tired. I am aware of my need to do the things I can each day to strengthen my mental health, constructive things, things that bring at least a bit of joy and peace. You’re right in that there is still much to be treasured and thankful for. Sincerely appreciate, again, your thought provoking piece.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much, Brenda! I also hate the loss of freedom the most, and struggle with it. I hate not being able to take care of my mother, who needs me, or helping to take care of my granddaughter without worrying about making her sick. And as this drags on (and on) it gets harder to cope. I think we all need to be honest with ourselves about that, and recognize that the struggle is real. We tend to believe that only people who have the virus or who have lost someone to the virus are struggling (and they most certainly are, profoundly). But almost everyone is effected, one way or another.
      So the best we can do is focus on the things we can control and the many gifts and blessings we are still able to enjoy, because they are still there. And forgive ourselves for those times when we can’t even manage that!

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Ditto, ditto, ditto, Ann. ” But the truth is that the constant stream of bad news and challenges can wear me out. Sometimes I find myself just wanting to retreat from it all, effectively putting my life on hold until things are better.” I feel exactly the same way. I’m usually a positive, optimistic person, and yet I can’t seem to handle this with grace. My life isn’t even that much different, and I feel so distracted. Thank you for sharing your feelings and struggles; you brought a bit of comfort to my life to know I’m not alone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are absolutely not alone! There is so much bad news right now that we honestly can’t process it all, and I think we have to remember that is okay. Our ancestors didn’t have the constant stream of bad news, even when they lived through tougher times, so it helped them put it into perspective, I think. We need to do the same thing by actively controlling what we allow into our hearts and minds. Learn just enough to keep you informed, and then turn your attention to the things you can control and the things are are grateful for. Trust me, it helps!

      Liked by 1 person

  33. I honestly can’t say Covid has changed many things for us. Sure, a few trips have been canceled. But both my wife and I have far-flung families so family gatherings were never a constant, and with retirement life has been “on hold” anyway. (Yeah, right…) Restaurants have become to go affairs forcing us to stay in the neighborhood (who wants to reheat to go food from the drive home anyway?) As for the other bad news? IMO that’s triggered by the examples of our idiot president and his enablers, and we’d be dealing with that anyway. Covid has only made the incompetent leadership more obvious. We can at least partially solve that problem in November, so until then, patience, and stay safe.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My husband and I have had our lives more effected, mostly because we like to travel a lot, had a granddaughter born early in the middle of this mess, and have a mother who lives in a retirement home and needs help we are no longer allowed to give. So we have made some rather large adjustments, but at the same time, we are still able to live our lives in many ways. I think you’re right in that we need to focus on that, and the things we can control, rather than the things we can’t. Until then, as you say, patience is the key!

      Liked by 1 person

  34. My own life hasn’t changed all that much as, for various health reasons, I never went out much anyway and since moving to rural Wales haven’t had much of a social life! Most of my contacts have been online via email or blogs. But for my husband, it’s different. He used to do all the food shopping: now I do nearly all of it, online. He’d go out to get videos and cds from the local shops, and that’s missing. He can’t get his own clothes. Visits to a local pub (bar) for an early lunch – missing. Other things, too. Very luckily, we have a happy marriage with no arguments or fights (that would be appalling! I feel so sorry for people in that situation, particulary right now.) so that helps. But yeah – the small things are important. Recently I managed to get a few delivery slots for the supermarket he used to shop at, so could finally source a few of our favourite foods, and that was a real mood-lifter for both of us. In case you’re wondering: lots of fresh green veggies, and some ice cream. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so glad, Val! Sometimes it’s the little things that make all the difference, especially for someone like your husband who has had his schedule disrupted so much. I’m glad that your life has remained mostly the same. I’ve come to believe that the people who are handling this the best are those who have managed to find a way to live as normal a life as possible through it all. I think that depends a lot on what is normal for each of us, and also how much our area has been impacted by the virus. Stay safe and well, and enjoy that ice cream!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  35. For sure “Gratitude is the attitude”. All too often, we concentrate on what is wrong or bad with our lives and not on what is right or good. We have a lot to be thankful for, to be sure. In my case, I was able to visit my kids in Vancouver, just as the pandemic was arriving, I made it home safely, I have shelter, food to eat and fine company and I am retired, so I am neither out of work, nor out of funds. I miss the big trips, but treasure the small ones. Thanks for sharing. Allan

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so glad you were able to get that visit in before the restrictions! And yes, focusing on what we do have as opposed to what we have given up really does help, especially if we’re lucky enough not to have lost a loved one to this illness or lost our home or income due to the restrictions. And some day, the big trips will be allowed again….that is one of the hopes that keeps me going! Thanks for the comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Excellent post. And yes ‘here we are’. I have more or less adjusted to the new pandemic normal. But then, just as I think I’ve got it all sorted another new thing comes up and reminds me that this is a fluid situation; changing from day to day.But I’m alive and I’m well. And i’m still here! I found this post via Susiesopinions and I’m glad I did.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know what you mean! It is fluid and changes just as fast as we adapt to it. But in a weird way, that almost gives me hope that it will be beaten (either by a vaccine or an effective treatment) eventually. Meanwhile, we just appreciate the positive, as you say! Thanks for your comment, I really appreciate it!

      Like

  37. Such a poignant post Ann. We have been fortunate to live in a place with so far no covid cases, but the hardest part has been being so close to my children and family in the U.S. but not being able to travel there. We were supposed to go in May and we have of course postponed, but now as time goes on I am realizing it could easily be months before we can travel and before we can take the risk of going through airports and being around family, especially our mothers who are both in their eighties. It makes me sad. I hear you. Yet, we can at least see each other and speak to each other and for that I am very grateful. As you say, it is those small things which somehow gain more importance and become larger and more gratifying….

    As always a very thoughtful heartfelt post.

    Peta

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Peta! It is always good to hear from you. I hope that you will be able to visit your families in the US before too much more time passes, but yeah….it looks as if we’re in this for the long haul, sadly.

      Like

  38. I couldn’t agree more, Ann – life is for living, and living it now. The problems we face are part of it, and some of not most can’t be ignored. Better to face them and get it over with! That way we’ll be able to find joy wherever it is possible. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly! Waiting until things are better doesn’t work, because there’s always some problem to be faced. Maybe not as big as what we’re dealing with right now, but there’s always something. We just need to find our joy despite that.

      Liked by 2 people

  39. Yes the new modified life thanks to fear and frenzy may be exaggerated. But you’re wise to exercise caution with your 90 year old mom. Happy Birthday Gramma. And caution with a newborn. I ended my job on day one of this pandemic. So I decided to throw myself full bore back into my writing and music. I find I am starting to gather job offers to work remotely doing tech support and customer service. The other day I read one offering 50-70 dollars per hour. So maybe I can come out of this in good shape. But who knows. It is the uncertainty of what and how life will be lived going forward that gnaws. Chris. Queen

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, the uncertainty is the hardest thing to cope with. I do hope that you find a job that you like and are able to work at from home. It sounds as if you have some promising leads. Thanks for the comment!

      Like

Comments are closed.