Time Flies

If that old saying “time flies when you’re having fun” is true, then all I can say is, I must be having the time of my life.  Because time is flying by so quickly these days that I can barely keep up.  According to the calendar, Summer is drawing to a close.  But I swear it was just yesterday that I was busy replacing all the Winter clothes in my closet with light-weight Summer tops and capris.  How can it possibly be time to start thinking about Fall?

And it’s not just the seasons that are flying by.  The nieces and nephews that I watched grow up now have kids of their own, and some of those kids have already graduated from high school.  Logically, I know that means a whole lot of years have passed since my nieces and nephews were born.  But emotionally, I tend to believe that they all must have found some sort of time machine that turned them into mature adults in the blink of an eye.  And I can only assume that my own kids must have used the same machine, because how else could my youngest one be thirty?

I’ve always known that time is a relative thing, because I remember the days of my own childhood when I would sit in classroom, sneaking peeks at the wall clock while I waited impatiently for recess.  The minutes simply dragged by until that long-awaited recess bell finally rang and we all rushed outside to play.  And yet those fifteen minutes of recess just flew by, because it seemed as if I had barely started to have fun before the bell rang again and we all had to line up and go back in the school building.

But what I didn’t realize was the fact that the older I became, the faster time would speed by.  I didn’t know that I was going to reach a stage in my life when I really, really wanted time to slow down, and not just when I was having fun.  I had no idea that with age comes the understanding that our time in this world is limited, and meant to be savored and enjoyed as much as we possibly can.

It almost seems unfair that this is a lesson that we don’t seem to learn until we have lived long enough that we’ve become far too familiar with grief and loss, and stopped assuming that the people we care for the most will always be with us.  At age sixty-one, I’m also accepting that I no longer have a long lifetime ahead of me to pursue unfulfilled dreams or repair broken relationships.  So I suppose it’s only natural that I feel that time is passing by far too quickly now, and why I really wish there was a way to slow things down a bit.

Unfortunately, I have absolutely no control of the great cosmic clock, which will tick on at the same speed it always has, whether I like it or not.  The only thing I can do, and the only thing any of us can do, is to spend the time we have left wisely.  For me, that means letting go of petty jealousy and anger, and actually doing the things that I love rather than thinking that I’ll get around to it someday.  And most importantly, making sure I spend as much time with the people I love right now, while I still can.

93 thoughts on “Time Flies

  1. Time does seem to pass by more quickly the older we get. Perhaps, we appreciate the passage more, knowing that things are always in a constant state of flux. We have seen our children grow at rapid speed. We see how our grandchildren are literally, ‘growing like weeds’. Age teaches us to slow down and appreciate the wonder of it all…even if only to give ourselves time to reflect. The beauty in this is something you express so well; we must choose to do the things we most want to do. We must spend time with our friends and family. We must put aside the meaningless activities and indulge in the ones that draw upon our passions. Time is of the essence. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Exactly! I spend far too much time in meaningless activities, and then convince myself I’m too busy to do some of the things I really want to do. And that’s a luxury I can’t afford at my age. It’s time to make the most of the time I have, and to keep my priorities firmly in mind at all times. Thanks for the insightful comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Tempus fugit. Time flies. The ancient Romans must have felt the same about the passage of time. While the clock keeps ticking at the same pace whether we are young or old, psychologically time appears to accelerate as we grow older. There must be something to this experience since my mother once made the same observation. Yes, let us make the best we can with the remaining time, Ann!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Yes, I never understood how time can “speed up” until I reached a certain age. I think it is because I’m more aware of my own mortality now, and the mortality of those I love. So I want more time, instead of less, which wasn’t the same as when I was young and so very impatient. But as you say, all we can do it make each moment count as much as we can!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I’ve been feeling much the same recently, Ann. I’ll be 70 in a couple of years and I just can’t believe it… where the heck did all the years go, and what the heck have I been doing all this time? Most of us can’t know how much longer we’ve got. If I follow in my mum’s footsteps I could have another five or six years (though she was ill, so I guess being as healthy as possible should help!), if I follow in those of some other relatives, I could have another thirty or more years… Unlike you though, I find it difficult to alter my lifestyle to make more of the remaining years… so I guess I’ll just plod on as usual. I hope you’re able to fulfill your needs on this one. Hugs.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Val! And honestly, there’s no reason to alter your lifestyle. I’m trying to make changes in mine because I’ve found that to be necessary, but I really believe each of us gets to make our own decisions about that. And I’ve seen your work on your blog…it seems to me you are making very good use of your time already!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Lovely post, Ann. As a child, I remember the lazy, hot days of summer seemed to go on forever. Now, in a blink of an eye, we’re breaking out the sweaters and getting the crock pots ready. The passage of time can be bittersweet at times, but I’m thankful to still be around to turn those pages in the calendar…it goes so fast.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Me, too. I know being here at my age is a gift that not everyone gets. And remember how slow time went when we were kids and waiting for something good to happen? I remember being so confused when people would say, “It’s almost Christmas” when Christmas was a week away. A whole week, which seemed to take forever to pass! Now, I think it’s almost Christmas around mid-November…..

      Liked by 1 person

  5. My parents and I were just having this conversation. It is scary how fast time goes by. Life certainly passes in a blink of an eye. Its definitely a lesson to never wait to do something you could do today. Such a beautifully written post 💖

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much, Lisa! I truly believe that the older I get, the more I realize that there is never an excuse to put off till later what I can do today. Because now I know there may not be a “later,” so why wait? Thanks for the comment!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly! I can’t believe 2019 is more than halfway over….didn’t it just start? I wish there was a way to slow things down, but of course we can’t. So I completely agree that we need to make the best of our time, all the time!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I can relate big-time. Age must not only mellow us, but focuses us on what matters, or what outlives us. One of my bosses at one time was getting ready to retire. He told me he was wanting to “do” something that would launch his legacy. Honestly, I didn’t like the guy for other reasons, but when he said that, I had to bite my tongue. So many think they have to “do” a big splash in life before they’re unable to jump off the plank. Frankly, our legacy is what our lives have spoken about us all these decades. Here, in your post, is a great example of just “being” who you are, and what and who you love, while time is given. Love it. You have the right attitude.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Alan! And I completely agree, our legacy is our lives and how we lived them. When I think of the loved ones who have passed away, I don’t think of their “accomplishments.” I think of who they were, how they treated me and others, and what I learned from them. And that makes me so very grateful for their lives. I think your boss had the wrong end of the stick for sure. And good for you for knowing that, even when you were young!

      Liked by 1 person

    • You’re right, Cecilia, and I think that is what makes us more careful of how we spend our time now. We know that we’ve lived more than half our lives, so we want to spend our remaining time as mindfully as we possibly can.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it probably is a good thing, even though I want it to slow down. But you’re right, when we are suffering or anxious, we want and need time to speed up. I hope your dark days weren’t too long, and that things are much better now, Svet!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I feel the same way, Ann. Time is impossible to control, when it goes by slowly and now when it goes by too fast. Embracing the moments and letting go of all the unnecessary gripes – it’s a trick we all need to learn. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. As a child it seemed I had to wait forever for the things I was looking forward to. Now, a blink of an eye and time has past There’s a favorite lyric of mine in a country song that goes something like, “I’m getting too old to make new old friends.”

    Liked by 3 people

    • I know! Time was so slow when we were kids (day seemed like forever), and it still goes slowly when we’re waiting for something good. But most of the time, it goes by far too quickly for my taste, especially now that I am not young anymore. I wish there were a happy medium, but since there’s not, I’ll just have to learn to make the most of the good times I do have, and to stop wasting precious time!

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  9. I thought I was the only one wondering how the time goes so quickly. Summer is almost over; the school year has already started; the holidays are around the corner. It can be scary but is definitely a reminder to live our days to the fullest.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is scary! I honestly do feel as if Summer just started, and am befuddled that it’s almost over. But all we can do is to live the days we do have to the fullest, and hope that we can remember to stop sweating the small stuff. Now we need to make sure we are always spending our time wisely, I think!

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  10. Your invocation of childhood emotions while waiting for the recess nailed the flaw in the space-time Continuum. As they say, there is a game afoot and it’s on me! The conclusions you have drawn are chastening. Thank you for the beautiful message.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Yes, I agree with you. I was recently thinking about my parents’ ages when they died, and it was a jolt to realize how close I am to those ages. I had a little come to Jesus meeting with myself and came to the same conclusions as you have. Now or never, eh?

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Someone explained it to me once as fractions. When you’re 5, a year is a huge fraction of your life and it seems like eternity. When you’re 62, as I am, a year is a small fraction and seems like nothing. Makes sense to me anyway! Your post really speaks to me as I become ever more conscious of how little time is left – and of that, how much will be at my current level of fitness? So yes, seize the day! Having said all that, i don’t want to be young again, unless I could be young without its insecurities and with the wisdom I have acquired in the last few decades!

    Liked by 3 people

    • That’s a very good point….I never thought in terms of time as fractions of our lives before, but it makes a whole lot of sense! And I also agree about being young again. Yes, I want my young body back, with it’s energy, tight skin and good eyesight. But no, I don’t want the insecurities that I had at that age. If there is a heaven, it will mean we get our “old” minds paired with our “young” bodies. That would be ideal!

      Liked by 2 people

    • That’s fascinating, Anabel. You have made me think of another factor in this time -perception puzzle: at 79 I believe and expect to live another 20 years. That’s a long time and not a small fraction. Maybe that s one more reason why I don’t actually find that time is flying. On the other hand, I have useful flashes of commonsense when I know I could die tomorrow. It’s a bit crazy- making!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I always think of lifespan in terms of a car fuel tank. If we’re lucky, you and I may have plus or minus a quarter-tank left. Thanks for the gentle reminder that life is wonderful, but still way too short.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. The concept of time and how we perceive it, is such an interesting one. I definitely recall those years of school as a child, where like you, each day felt like a year and I thought it would NEVER end. And now, months and years fly by and it IS true that the older we get the faster time goes. But perhaps it is accurate to say, that, as well, the more we appreciate it.

    One way of having time slow down during day I find is either when I am painting, playing my flute or meditating. All of these activities, make the brain itself slow down and at least allow the capture of some quality time during a day, before it is over.

    As always I so enjoy reading your posts…

    Peta

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you, Peta! And I agree, slowing down our brain does make time slow down. Sometimes, when I really need a break, I just “unplug” from things: my phone, my computer, and even the television. It is amazing how much slower things go then….

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  15. Amen! You said it all so eloquently Ann and I must say that I feel the same way. It seems like only yesterday my 21 year old daughter was just a baby and my biggest concerns were about nappies and feeding. These days the worries seem far bigger but I think it’s all relative. Yes, time flies! All we can do is live each day the best we can and make the most of every moment with those we love. Wonderful post as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Miriam! When I was young, I never understood the concept of “time flies.” But now I do for sure. And as you say, all we can do is make the most of the time we have, doing our best to make each moment with our loved ones count. It is always so good to hear from you!

      Liked by 2 people

  16. What a rush of responses, and so interesting! Your writing really resonates with me to today. One theme coming through its “now or never!” — I have that too at 79! What’s more, having those adventures may slow time down. Research seems to be saying that when we have memorable, novel experiences, time slows down. When we are young everything is new. If days and months go by without much change, we don’t remember them. So yes– let’s love the precious moments and look forward to new adventures, however small.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s a very good point, Rachel! Maybe the reason time goes faster as we age is because we’re doing “same old, same old” rather than new things. And I have to say that time is moving slowly for me at the moment, because we’re getting my mom ready to move into a senior living community….and that’s a new thing! Once that’s over, it will speed right back up unless I find another new thing to occupy my thoughts. Thanks for this comment!

      Liked by 1 person

      • It does make sense, doesn’t it? I can see you will dive straight back into something new. I’ve lost the book I read about this but NYT has an article “where did the time go? Do not ask the brain” by Benedict Carey. Fascinating stuff!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Your posts reach out to so many of us, Ann. I wonder about the relatively short time left to me to achieve whatever dreams are left. Someone made a vaguely lecherous comment to me about my fancy hose at work and I was torn between delight at being noticed/should I be offended. I am still delighted…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I think the sense of urgency kicks in after a certain age, especially in the achieving dreams department. And I can completely relate to how you reacted to that comment! I think I would have been secretly delighted as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. One of my favorite quotes about time is : The days are long but the years are short. So true. There are some long days which don’t seem to get over at all. And then you suddenly realise we are 4 months away from 2020. It is crazy. This concept of time.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Yes to all of it, Ann! Time really seems to fly by the older we get – remember being a child and asking your parents every five seconds how long until you got from A to B? 😉 I think a key to change our reception of time is to try to live more in the moment, and not in our memories of the past or our hopes and fears for the future.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I’m all for the time machine theory! A nice reminder to savor and enjoy each day, no matter what stage of life we are in. I love everything you said in the last paragraph especially. No time for anger and jealousy, focuing on doing what I enjoy and being with people I love. Wonderful post as always.

    Liked by 1 person

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